Monday, January 20, 2014

Brockle Let's Me Know He is Ready For Scent Work


I try to stay positive.
Brockle and I went to protection practice.
Dog after beautiful dog worked like a maniac.
Steady, focused, they would have worked all day if they could.
Then it was our turn.


Bad guy! There's the bad guy!


I chomp bad guys!



You better run! And your mama too!

Re-engage
Whoa there, bad guy, just a sec...
Dude. Can't you smell that?



There's something really smelly around here.
Um, Janet? He's not listening.
Seriously, tell the bad guy to cool it. OK?
"Are you shittin' me?" asks the bad guy.

Here, I found it.
Week old dog treat, a little moldy....nom, nom, nom.

OK. Back to business.

Chomp!
Good dog. Sigh.

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

:-)

DarcC said...

Lmao.

IndyApp said...

The Pictures make the story! Hysterical!

EvenSong said...

"You gotta get your priorities right, Mom!"

jenj said...

Just make sure the bad guy smells like bacon? LOL!

mugwump said...

Brockle is a trip. He was not born to bite that's for sure, but HMT has faith in him and the decoys (bad guys)think he is "interesting," not a "total loser."
So, it's time for me to trust in my trainers. Those decoys are amazing. They teach the dogs not just to bite, but somehow, the dogs learn it's a very, very fun game, not an act of aggression. They are friendly, mannered, and socialized. It's incredible.

mugwump said...

Good one jenj.

Becky said...

The body language of the decoy guy is the best part.

"Really, Brockle? Really? I mean, any time you want to bite me - seriously. Aaaaaanytime now."

Tara said...

Oh, LOL, to funny....
Tara

Heila said...

LOL!! You may want to consider Ritalin for Brockle, I think he has ADHD ;)

Heila said...

LOL!! You may want to consider Ritalin for Brockle, I think he has ADHD ;)

MichelleL said...

That was priceless! Thanks for the chuckle.

strivingforsavvy said...

Love it!

bassgirl said...

Your narrative is perfect!

Anonymous said...

Hang in there. I could write a lot about the dog I am training right now, sometimes it's just about discovering what the right motivation is.

Anonymous said...

"Good dog" but no "sigh" from me! I like a dog with a good brain! I'd wager that, if the decoy's energy had been perceived by Brockle as a real threat, Brockle would have shredded him and not been distracted. However, B understood that it was just a "very, very fun game" and merely decided he'd found something that was even more fun at that moment. (Doesn't look like you re-focused him immediately, either!?) I say that, with consistency and good timing on your part, Brockle will understand in no time that even "fun games" aren't always optional... Oh the fun you and Brockle will have together, enjoy!! :) -irmgard

mugwump said...

irmgard- you're right we didn't refocus immediately, the dogs get a round of applause and a lot of praise in between.

Holly said...

had this dog been mine, he would have been kenneled the second he chose another, higher reward (moldy food). Off track = lose the chance to play.

mugwump said...

Holly - Lucky for Brockle he's mine.

LadyFarrier said...

@Holly

Can you please explain why you would kennel a dog? What is the reasoning behind it? This is not something I was raised with.

Unknown said...

Kenneling is like a toddler time out.

I've only used it a couple of times, and I haven't had to do it more than once a year/dog.

I run agility. If the dog doesn't want to play, and I've run down the whole list of things that might be legitimately impeding the dog's interest (too hot and needs a wetting down, needs water, needs to potty, something over there is way too distracting but a fleeting thing - like a bunny on the field, etc...) When I've gone down the whole list and still have a nose-to-the-ground recall-what-recall la-la-la-la-I-can't-hear-you dog, they go in the sideline kennel.

Somebody else runs the exercise and the dog comes back out. They get the point. OH! THIS is what we are doing right now. Okay.

You don't want to shut the dog down. You don't want to make a big deal of it like it's a punishment. You just have the dog drop in the kennel, tell 'em to stay, and give it that 5-10 minutes before they come back out.

Helps if you have dogs that look to the kennel as a rest/timeout space. Mine get their meals in there and when I have to answer the door go to the kennels and get a treat for the temporary lock-down.

I don't think this would work near as well if the dog thought the kennel was a bad place.

I think it does two things. It breaks the behavior pattern (all those yummy bunny dungs all over the field) and gives them time to find their focus again. (you have treats? why didn't you say so?)

Thoughts?

Holly said...

LadyFarrier: It's one of the things Bob Bailey has said and pointed out. When there is down time for a dog (chosen by him or waiting for a handler that is doing something else), it will take the dog several minutes to "come back" to the handler. If that is happening, make the time with the handler more valuable, by removing the ability to be reinforced by other things than the handler.

http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2002b/attention.htm

You might do a google search of Bob and Marian Bailey, to see why trainers pay attention when he speaks.

Holly said...

Unknown: sort of. Read the short article I posted in my response to LadyFarrier. It's not exactly about a time out, it is more about speed & value of reinforcment.

mugwump said...

Holly - I read your suggested column. I'm posting again soon on my personal insight on what was happening and how it was handled. I think you'll find it interesting.

Anonymous said...

That dog is so smart! He saw no threat to you,just a game. I'd like to see what would happen if the "bad guy" homed in on you instead of the "game"

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